Drought

We can help you to maintain healthy trees, even during a drought.

Every tree is going to be effected differently by the drought depending on their species and surroundings. If you have a concern, it is best to call today to schedule a FREE yard evaluation and let one of our arborists educate you about your trees specific needs.

You can find some broad advice and tips below from Sacramento Tree Foundation:

Mulch/Woodchips:

Natural, wood chip mulch is one of the best ways to save water and can keep your trees healthy. A thick layer of mulch on top of the soil around your tree will keep moisture in the soil and protect the roots from extreme temperatures.
Keep mulch 4 inches away from the trunk, spread it 4 feet in diameter (or out to the drip line if possible), and pile it 6 inches deep.

You can be added to our waiting list for mulch here

Trees Less Than 5 Years Old:

The roots of young trees are located near the trunk and grow 12-18 inches below the surface. A young tree needs 10-15 gallons of water per week. Slowly soak the area near the base of the tree 2-3 times per week with 5 gallons each time. Check the soil moisture before adding water.

You can use:

  • A hose on a slow trickle
  • A soaker hose
  • A bucket with a 1/8” hole drilled near the bottom. Fill with water collected from your shower and allow it to slowly drip into the soil. Move the bucket to various areas around the base of the tree to soak the entire root ball. As your young tree grows, expand your watering area away from the trunk to include the growing root zone.

Mature Trees:

The roots of a mature tree extend underground even wider than the branches extend above ground. Adding water near the trunk of a mature tree will not reach the roots. Slowly soak the area throughout the root zone for several hours to reach the roots 12-18 inches below the surface.

You can use:

  • A soaker hose
  • An oscillating sprinkler on a low setting
  • Drip emitters
  • A bucket with a 1/8” hole drilled near the bottom. Fill with water collected from your shower and allow it to slowly drip into the soil. Move the bucket to various areas in the root zone and refill. If your root zone extends under hardscape or beyond your property, slowly soak as much of the root zone as possible.

Special Note: Native trees, like valley oaks, which have never received regular irrigation may be harmed by adding extra water. Contact a Certified Arborist if you have questions about the health of your native or mature tree.

Rescources: http://www.sactree.com/drought